Apple Hits $1 Trillion To Become First Trillion Dollar Company; But It’s Still Not The Most Valuable Company In The World

Today, Apple (AAPL) became the first $1 trillion public U.S. company. Its stock jumped 2.8 percent to $207.05 (as of 9:15 a.m. Pacific), taking its gain to 9 percent since this Tuesday, when it released its latest quarterly earnings. Apple management reported higher than expected quarterly results, and mentioned that it bought back $20 billion of its own shares.

But in spite of all of the press coverage around this major milestone, Apple is not even the most valuable company in the world. That distinction belongs to fellow tech giant Amazon. How can that be, when Amazon’s market capitalization is only a ‘meager’ 887 billion? The key lies in the metric used to measure a company’s value.

Most analysts use “Enterprise Value” rather than market capitalization to measure a company’s value because it accounts for the total operating value of the firm and adjusts for the capital structure of the firm (with equity, debt, and cash). A large part of Apple’s equity value is in the hoard of cash on its balance sheet, which doesn’t reflect the ongoing value of the company. They could use that cash to issue a dividend or buyback shares, but it wouldn’t change how much the actual company is worth based on its potential future profits. In fact, Apple typically buys back shares every quarter.

Amazon passed Apple in enterprise value back in June during its meteoric rise and is now worth $80B more than Apple. Amazon and Apple are just two of the tech giants (dare we say “conglomerates”) that now make up the most valuable companies in the world. We took a closer look at the rest of the tech giants and plotted their enterprise values over time using Sentieo’s Plotter tool.

 

Tech Giants Enterprise Value

Sentieo

Interactive Chart: http://snt.io/c8B2JRXn2

Looking at the chart, we can see that Apple (black line) and Google (red line) had been leading the pack since 2016. However, around February of this year, Amazon surpassed them both to become the most valuable, and after some back and forth, broke away at the beginning of June.

Facebook (blue line) and Netflix (purple line), while also members of the “FANG” group, actually have much lower enterprise value that Amazon and Apple.

 

Regardless of Enterprise Value or Market Cap, Tech Is Taking Over

The more important thing to note is that these tech giants are taking the stage as the world’s most valuable companies, both in enterprise value and market cap. In July, CNBC reported that the majority of the returns this year on the S&P 500 index have from tech giants. The tech companies in the table below are responsible for 99 percent of the S&P 500 returns this year, meaning the rest of the S&P remained almost flat. (Data as of July 10, 2018)

This hasn’t been the case since the last dot-com boom in the 1990s, when Cisco was anticipated to become the first trillion dollar company. We plotted a few tech and oil companies to look at how market leadership has changed over the past 10 years.

The large grey spike in 2008 represents PetroChina’s peak market cap.

In 2006, Microsoft (blue line) had the fourth largest market cap but was still eclipsed by Exxon (orange), GE (black), and PetroChina (gray) — and closely followed by Total (teal).

In 2011, Apple (red) came in third place to Exxon and PetroChina.

But in 2016, Apple (red), and Microsoft (blue), Amazon (purple) and Facebook (green) all took the top 4 highest market cap spots, dissimilar to the situation today.

 

Market Cap: Tech vs. Oil 

Interactive Chart: http://snt.io/aHB2JPRNV

Based on their monstrous market share, we anticipate that the tech giants will rule for a while — unless another unexpected dot-com crash occurs.

Guest Post: 5 Oil Patch Themes You Should Be Following In 2017

Guest Post courtesy of happy Sentieo client and energy expert Philip Dunham .

2016 was a volatile year for oil and gas. WTI traded to lows in the mid $20s, then rebounded to finish the year around $54. The road to recovery for the energy industry in 2017 can be characterized as cautiously optimistic as WTI prices have stabilized over the past couple of weeks and energy companies have started to slowly hire and ramp activity.

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There were a number of themes that emerged as the year progressed including:

  • Rebounding rig counts and the return of service cost inflation
  • The Dallas Fed and Permian-focused E&Ps expressing concerns over rich Permian Basin acreage valuations
  • Another year of low oil prices and OPEC production cuts
  • The RINsanity of ethanol blending and a possible border adjustment tax
  • Natural gas coming out from the shadow of oil with demand catching up to supply

We will review the themes of 2016 and those themes going forward into 2017. Read More

Oil & Gas Research the Smart Way with Sentieo $NFX $FANG $CLR $APC

The O&G industry reports tons of data in both volume and detail—from drilling rig and pressure pumping data to well production info. Looking for and analyzing all of this information for your investment ideas is a very necessary but time consuming process. Designed by buysiders for buysiders, Sentieo is the best tool on the market for leveraging technology to rapidly compress your research cycle and give you more time to generate true alpha insights.

In this post, I’m going to show you a glimpse into the world of oil & gas research using Sentieo—so that you can spend more time analyzing your the findings and try to come up with answers to questions such as:

Which E&P companies might be at risk of defaulting on their loan obligations?

Has an E&P operator you are following announced those new well results yet?

What would this company specific data would look if I plotted it against other metrics?

What are some ways I can use Sentieo to research industry trends?

What are companies are saying about break-even oil prices and well-economics?

How many drilled but uncompleted wells are in a company’s backlog?

Read More

The Accounting Neverland: Software that refuses to grow up

One way to perform due diligence on a company is to look at the estimated useful life assumptions behind the depreciation and amortization calculations.  Overly optimistic assumptions will inflate reported earnings while overly conservative assumptions will deflate reported earnings.

One outlier is Continental Resources (CLR).  This oil and gas producer estimates that the useful life of its “Enterprise resource planning software” will be 25 years.  So let’s take a trip down memory lane and examine what software looked like two and a half decades ago…

Read More

Verifying oil and gas estimates

Performing due diligence on the accuracy of oil & gas reserve estimates requires two elements:

  1. An understanding of the art and science of reserve estimation.  This blog post will provide a brief overview of reserve estimation techniques.
  2. Technical information on the methodology used and its key assumption.  Places to look for technical disclosures would be investor presentations, CORRESP filings, and (occasionally) the 10-Ks / annual reports.  However, this process can be tedious whenever investor presentations are difficult to locate.

Read More

E&P Revolving Lines of Credit

In today’s article, we will be covering a very hot topic in the E&P sector right now: liquidity. More specifically, how you can use Sentieo to quickly find out about a company’s credit facility as well as any restrictive indentures that might be out there limiting the amount of debt that a company can take on.

Most E&P companies are financed with some combination of equity and debt. Often times, these companies will supplement their equity and debt financing with revolving lines of credit that can come in two forms: asset-based or a more traditional facility based on earnings.

Asset based revolving lines of credit are tied to the present value of their proved reserves (reserves with a high degree of certainty that these resources can be extracted from the ground) and are typically assigned to non-investment grade companies since they do not have the creditworthiness to have a facility that is simply governed by earnings. The amount of borrowing capacity on these reserve based lending credit facilities is typically reassessed twice a year, once in the spring and once in fall. Read More