Sentieo Document Search: Updates in the Newly Released v 4.0

With the latest release, Sentieo’s industry-leading Document Search got even better! 

As a part of our continuous improvement, we have added both new document sources to our very extensive collection, and additional functionalities to improve your complete workflow. In addition, to help users navigate through our non-English language documents, we have added language filtering. 

In the new version, users can now search documents from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and PubMed, totaling about one million new documents. In detail, we have over 20 years of history for PubMed (primarily the MEDLINE database), six years for FDA documents (press releases, recalls, withdrawals and others), and three years of EPA documents (press releases, enforcement announcements, superfund and brownfield updates). These document sets come on the heels of our private company data and LexisNexis news sources integrations last year. 

These documents can be integrated into your workflow just like the rest of our other docs: fully searchable (including our ML-based synonym search, saved searches and saved search alerts), with the ability to highlight and capture screenshots for your Notebook for future use, as well as our extensive Boolean operators. Some of the documents from the FDA and the EPA are tagged to publicly traded or private entities. 

To find these documents, use the Source drop-down anywhere in our Document Search. 

In this short instructional video, we go over the new document sources with some searches, and we show how these additions can be seamlessly integrated into your workflow. We show how to search FDA documents for mentions of listeria, a frequent cause of product recalls, highlight, label and save these passages; we then look for EPA documents containing mentions of superfund site Newtown Creek, and we save this search so new mentions will be pushed to us. Finally, we look at the PubMed database, where we find an interesting article, and we use our screenshot function to grab a chart with study results from it. 

 

 

In this second video, we show how to filter for documents in different languages in our Document Search, and how to use non-English search queries with our Booleans. We then show how to highlight and label the doc just like one can do with an English language doc.