[Guide] Don’t Miss Insights Next Earnings Season: 5 Ways to Optimize Your Time

Why We Wrote This Guide

With companies releasing a multitude of documents every hour of the day during earnings season, getting insights quickly can feel like an impossible task.

The hundreds of companies that analysts track each produce hundreds of data points, documents, and news — any of which could inform a change in corporate strategy or competitive response.

During earnings season, competitive intelligence professionals are often drowning in data, and can miss important insights as a result.

 

 

 

We came up with 5 ways that you (and your team) can optimize your time during earnings. Download the full whitepaper here.

You can easily gain a competitive edge by staying ahead of emerging global or industry trends, including:

• consumer/customer preferences
• trends that are favorable/unfavorable to you or your competitors
• new or disruptive ideas and products

Ask yourself and your team:

What are the macro, global market, and consumer trends happening right now that are impacting my business and my peers?

How To Do It

Alternative datasets can give you great insight into market trends. Try a tool that includes datasets like:

• Twitter mentions – Observe globally trending topics, your competitor’s brand mentions, and their number of followers. Are they spending advertising money on Twitter?

• Alexa website visits – Are your competitor’s website visits going up or down? How come?

• Google Trends – How are people searching for your competitors on the web?

Understanding macro trends can also help you focus your efforts during earnings season. A tool that allows you to plot both financial and document data can expedite this step in your workflow.

In the example below, we plotted document mentions of “wage inflation” (green bars) against EBIT Margins for Cheesecake Factory and Texas Roadhouse (purple & orange lines). We see that as wage inflation has risen, there has been a substantial decline in the margins for the two chains. With visualization tools, CI analysts are able to see the factors that drive trends, and stay ahead of competititors.

Key catalysts to track include earnings announcements, product launches, and transactions. Use a calendar tool that automatically feeds in from your company watchlists.

For example, below we used our watchlist “Big Tech” to auto-populate our Sentieo earnings calendar for easy tracking.

 

Want to learn the 3 other ways that you (and your team) can optimize your time during earnings? Download the full whitepaper here.

Is Pumpkin Spice Over?

About a year ago, we wrote a popular blog post on pumpkin spice season. Based on Twitter data and search trends, we could see that pumpkin spice season had started earlier than ever, and was bigger than ever. 

Today, we declare that pumpkin spice is over, using the same data sets. 

Looking at the stacked search trends below, we can see that pumpkin spice was off to an ever-earlier and stronger season in August, running well above prior years (see light blue line). However, the trend peaked below last year’s peak (momentum investors know this sign), and has been tracking below recent years since then. 

We tracked down a couple of notable pumpkin spice season “kick-off” events this year.

Convenience store chain 7-11 announced that their pumpkin spice lattes were back on August 14, 2019.

Dunkin’ Brands (parent of ice cream chain Baskin Robbins) did not highlight the flavor until August 26, 2019.

Things really picked up in early September with releases from Hostess Brands (Nasdaq: TWNK), Restaurant Brands’ Tim Horton’s division (NYSE: QSR), Krispy Kreme, and others.  

Perhaps the biggest success story this pumpkin spice season came from Hormel (NYSE: HRL), which released a limited edition version of their legendary Spam: “[the] limited edition flavor features a blend of seasonal spices including cinnamon, clove, allspice and nutmeg to give it a subtle sweetness.” The September 23rd release was followed by another press release a few hours later mentioning that the $8.98/2-pack item was sold out from both Walmart’s e-commerce site and spam.com in under seven hours. 

Photo source: Hormel PR

For the final word on pumpkin spice, we used our Twitter data integration to see the trends around Starbucks (Nasdaq: SBUX), and their high-profile pumpkin spice beverages. Based on Twitter mentions, we note that, very much like the search trends, YoY mentions are down, and with a shorter “tail” versus prior years. Pumpkin spice just isn’t that big of a deal any more. (Interactive chart link)

To find out how Sentieo’s full workflow solution can help you harness multiple data sets, track promotional intensity, create visualizations, and more, please get in touch